Domestic Hot Water: A Better Option?

By Nick Tallos

The facts are frightening – especially since the problem can be avoided.

Consider this: As many as one in 10 patients hospitalized in the U.S. contracts an infection, according to the Wall Street Journal. That means nearly 2 million patients annually are infected by bacterium or other agents.

The end result?

The cost is nearly 100,000 deaths and $6.5 billion in overall losses.
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Domestic Hot Water: Faster, Better & Cheaper

From Green Lodging News

By Nick Tallos

“I turned on the water in the shower and waited for 10 minutes. Warm water finally started flowing, however it never lasted more than a minute and alternated mostly with cool to cold water.”

That’s the exact quote extracted from an online review of a guest who rated a hotel in Pennsylvania on The reviewer gave the hotel a rating of two out of a possible five. The site is full of similar comments from guests complaining about how long it took them to get hot water when they wanted to take a shower or wash their hands. Continue reading

The Importance of Showers, Eyewash Stations, and Tepid Water

From ISHN Magazine

In December 2009, a well-known manufacturing plant experienced a safety incident in which an employee was severely burned. The employee was exposed to a caustic chemical that sprayed out of a spigot and came in contact with exposed parts of his neck, hands, and arms. He was rushed to the nearest safety shower and thrust under a deluge of bone-chillingly-cold 40°F water. Due to the extremely frigid water, his body’s natural reaction was to leap out before being completely rinsed of the harmful irritant. He was then transported to the medical office where the combination of not being fully cleaned of the chemical and the length of travel time lead to worse burns than there should have been.

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z358.1-2009 is used to help plant managers and safety professionals comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations requiring employers to provide a safe workplace. This ANSI Standard establishes the universal minimum performance required for all eyewash and drench shower equipment used in plants. It states that all flushing equipment must be located in easy-to-reach areas, with the eyewash station or shower accessible within 10-seconds. This has become referred to as the 10 second rule. Additionally, eyewash stations and showers must be installed in well-lit and marked areas with a minimum flow rate of .4 GPM at 30PSI and 20 GPM at 30PSI respectively. The ANSI Standard also includes other design and operational specifications to assure that the safety showers and eyewashes are easy to use even in the case of an emergency by a victim with compromised mobility. Such features include valves that are easy to activate and will stay open once activated without having to hold a valve or handle open. OSHA regulations that apply to safety shower eyewash stations expand on the ANSI Standard requirements in certain high risk operations. For example, if open vessels containing hazardous substances are present, OSHA requires specialized safety shower and eyewash equipment to address the higher risks.


Success Through Diversity

From the Bucks County Courier Times Success Through Diversity

“For 30 years, Warminster’s ThermOmegaTech® has been helping to protect locomotives with the smallest pieces of equipment — valves that keep water from freezing and damaging engines.

Today, under new ownership, the valve manufacturer is growing by diversifying its product line to include everything from commercial plumbing products to regulators for barbecue grills.

The company was founded in 1982 by Fred Pirkle — a “modern-day Edison” who held numerous patents, said current CEO Jim Logue.”

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ThermOmegaTech Featured on Keystone Edge

Keystone Edge recently profiled CEO Jim Logue for their “Innovation & Job News” section. Jim discusses ThermOmegaTech’s journey into Lean Manufacturing and the growth that we’ve seen with it.

A few years ago, when CEO Jim Logue joined ThermOmegaTech,  a Warminster valve maker, he found a solid, old-line manufacturer. Still, he recalls, the assembly shop and the machine shop were not clearly communicating, leading to inefficiencies and delays.

No more Since 2010, Therm has been “on a lean journey,” says Logue. Mentored by the Delaware Valley Industrial Resources Center, Therm has taken steps to eliminate waste in its manufacturing processes and, equally important, change the plant’s culture by sharing information and ensuring that all 60 employees understand the big picture.”

“We basically have empowered every employee to have a say in how to improve their work area, or what they see elsewhere,” says Logue. “It gives purpose to coming to work.”

Since adapting the principles of lean manufacturing, Logue says, people are working better and smarter and operations are more coordinated and efficient. The company has seen 70% growth in revenues in its top products and has grown jobs by 10%. Logue anticipates adding another three positions in the next six to 12 months.

Read more.

Circuit Solver Featured in HPAC Engineering and Contractor Magazine

The Circuit Solver Balancing Valve was recently featured in both HPAC Engineering Magazine, as well as Contractor Magazine.

HPAC Engineering is the leading mechanical systems engineering publication and voice of leadership in the buildings industry.

Water-temperature-control valve

The Circuit Solver self-actuating temperature-control valve is designed to solve the problem of domestic hot water not being rapidly delivered to all parts of a building. When entering water temperature is below the valve’s set point, a thermal actuator begins to open the valve to establish a flow rate that will achieve set point. If the water temperature exceeds the set point, the valve begins to throttle back to find the current equilibrium point. This constant, automatic response to water temperature enables each hot-water branch to quickly and consistently deliver the correct temperature to each connected fixture. The all-stainless-steel valve complies with California AB1953 and meets NSF-61 standards. —Therm-Omega-Tech
View the release here.

Contractor Magazine is the online resource for mechanical contracting.

THE CIRCUIT SOLVER VALVE for domestic hot water systems is easy to install and maintain. It responds to changing water temperature and automatically changes flow to keep temperatures evenly distributed. It is constructed of all stainless steel.
View the release here.

Circuit Solver Balancing Valve featured in HPAC Engineering and Contractor Magazine

Circuit Solver Featured in Buildings Magazine

The Circuit Solver Balancing Valve was recently featured in Buildings Magazine, the leading publication for managing facilities.

The Circuit Solver is a valve for domestic hot water systems that reduces water waste, creates energy savings, and improves user satisfaction.

The valve provides an automatic response to water temperature that enables each hot water branch to quickly and consistently deliver the right temperature to each connected fixture.

View the entire Buildings Magazine release here.

ThermOmegaTech Interview on Manufacturing Revival Radio

Jim Logue, President of ThermOmegaTech®, was recently interviewed for Manufacturing Revival Radio’s weekly podcast. In the program, Jim speaks about his roots as a CPA and into ThermOmegaTech’s journey into Lean Manufacturing.


1. Jim, a former CPA by trade, ended up President of a manufacturer. He discusses the transition into that role, and makes the case that any good business person can thrive in manufacturing!

2. Jim, and Therm-Omega-Tech, is a big advocate of lean manufacturing, and he discusses their lean journey.

3. Founded to serve the North American railroad market, Therm has recently transitioned into industrial. Jim discusses this evolution, and the strategy behind it. There is strength in diversifying your product lines, including getting into the OEM market.

4. Despite being a traditional manufacturing, serving some established markets, they are evolving their go-to-market strategy to keep up with the modern age of sales and marketing.

5. Jim goes deeper on lean manufacturing, indicating that it is less about cutting waste, and more about culture. And you won’t believe how it has increased revenues…

6. Jim talks about the resurgence of American manufacturing, and what Therm did to buck the trends and thrive through the economic downtown.

7. 95% of the material produced by Therm is made on-site in their plant. Jim discusses why this is so, and why this is important to the future growth of the company.

8. Jim talks about the struggle to find talent to fill jobs with the right skills and knowledge, and what they do to train members of their team…including implementing a significant internship program.

To listen to the podcast, visit Manufacturing Revival Radio‘s website, subscribe though iTunes, or click the player below.

Best Practices for Effective Safety Showers

Best Practices for Effective Safety ShowersRecently, an employee at a chemical plant was accidentally exposed to a caustic solution that the plant was processing. He ran to the nearest safety shower in order to rinse the caustic off. Unfortunately, the safety shower was malfunctioning. Instead of tepid water in the 85°F (29° C) range, he was doused in water under 60° F (15.5° C). His initial reaction was to jump out, but his fellow employees held him under the cold water to rinse off the chemical. As a result, he ended up with hypothermia from the cold water.

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