Controlling Hydraulic Oil Temperatures

With cooler weather on the way, you may not be too worried about rising oil temperatures, but the fact is, any industrial hydraulic system running higher than 140 degrees is too hot. Consider that for every 18-degree increase in temperature above 140 degrees, the life of the oil is cut in half. Systems that operate at high temperatures can produce sludge and varnish, which result in the sticking of valve spools.

Pumps and hydraulic motors bypass more oil at high temperatures, causing the machine to operate at a slower speed. In some cases, high oil temperatures can waste electrical energy by making the pump drive motor pull more current to operate the system. O-rings also harden at higher temperatures, leading to more leaks in the system. So what checks and tests should you perform if the oil temperature is higher than 140 degrees?

Causes of Heat Generation

Every hydraulic system generates a certain amount of heat. Approximately 25 percent of the input electrical horsepower will be used to overcome heat losses in the system. Whenever oil is ported back to the reservoir and no useful work is done, heat will be generated.

The tolerances inside pumps and valves are normally in the ten-thousandths of an inch. These tolerances permit a small amount of oil to continuously bypass the internal components, causing the fluid temperature to rise. When oil is flowing through the lines, a series of resistances will be encountered. For example, flow controls, proportional valves and servo valves control the oil’s flow rate by restricting flow. When oil flows through the valves, a “pressure drop” occurs. This means that a higher pressure will exist at the valve’s inlet port than the outlet port. Anytime oil flows from a higher pressure to a lower pressure, heat is generated and absorbed in the oil.

When a system is initially designed, the reservoir and heat exchangers are sized to remove the generated heat. The reservoir allows some of the heat to dissipate through the walls to the atmosphere. If properly sized, heat exchangers should remove the balance of the heat, enabling the system to operate at approximately 120 degrees F…

To check out the full article visit Machinery Lubrication.com.

Why Your Hydraulic Machine Probably Needs an Oil Cooler – and a Big One!

A lot of attention is paid to contamination of hydraulic fluid, usually viewed as dirt, water, and air. But heat is also quite detrimental to hydraulic fluid and may account as many component failures as “regular” contamination.

The inconvenient truth about hydraulic machines is they are heat-generating systems. They are not unique in this respect: Energy conversion and control with 100% efficiency remains elusive. But it’s my contention that unavoidable inefficiency, which manifests as energy contamination of the hydraulic fluid, does not command the attention it deserves.

With the exception of the reservoir, every component in a hydraulic system is a heat-generating device. The process of moving hydraulic fluid through a conductor from A to B results in pressure drop and, therefore, heat generation. Installing depth filters to control particle contamination also creates a pressure drop, which increases heat load. Pumps and motors leak internally, resulting still more heat-generating pressure drops. The charge pump on a hydrostatic transmission is 100% heat load. In open circuits, heat-generating orifices, throttles (in all their various forms), and hydrostats are installed to control direction, flow, and pressure—and loads are counterbalanced by installing hydraulic resistance.

The point is that energy wasting-pressure drops are a fact of life in hydraulic systems. They can (and should) be minimized, but they can’t be completely eliminated. So let’s stop ignoring the elephant in the room. Because if left unchecked, energy contamination is just as problematic as particle contamination, and arguably more so.

Energy Contamination Affects Lubrication

Adequate lubrication of hydraulic components and efficient power transmission both depend on appropriate oil viscosity. If hydraulic fluid temperature is allowed to exceed that required to maintain viscosity at around 20 centiStokes (cSt), the likelihood of boundary lubrication—resulting in friction and wear—increases dramatically.

he temperature at which this point is reached depends on the fluid’s viscosity grade and its viscosity index (VI). The VI is a measure of an oil’s resistance to change in viscosity with a change in temperature. An oil with a high VI is often called a multi-grade oil. Multi-grade oils are often specified for equipment that must operate in cold. The high VI helps prevent the oil’s viscosity from increasing (thickening) at low temperatures. However, a high VI also helps prevent its viscosity from decreasing (thinning) at high temperatures.

In other words, the critical temperature as far as viscosity is concerned can be relatively low or high, depending on the oil being used…

To check out the full article visit Hydraulics & Pneumatics.

Upcoming Shows & Conventions 2019

Conventions 2019

Stop by our booth and learn how ThermOmegaTech’s innovative solutions using thermal actuator technology can protect your equipment, simplify your design, and improve your process.

Aerospace & Defense

MRO Americas
April 9th-11th Atlanta, GA

Commercial Plumbing

ASA ELEVATE2019
Women in Industry
April 30th – May 2nd San Diego, CA

ASA Emerge2019
Emerging Leaders
May 20th – 22nd Denver, CO

AIM/R Annual Conference
September 11th – 14th Walt Disney World

ASA Network 2019
Sept 25th – 27th Washington D.C.

ASPE Tech Symposium
October 24th-27th Pittsburgh, PA

Industrial

Safety 2019
Professional Development Conference & Exposition
June 9th – 12th New Orleans, LA

Railroad

ASLRRA 2019 Connections
April 6th-10th Orlando, Fl

Rail Supply Chain Summit
May 9th Chicago, IL

Railway Interchange
September 22nd-25th Minneapolis, MN

Sweetening the Deal with EcoFlow Valves

major U.S. sugar producer has several hundred pumps throughout the plant. These pumps are either using packing, which requires constant maintenance or using mechanical seals, which require a water supply to cool and flush it. In the latter instance, the water is usually either returned to a seal water tank or dumped to drain. Any water that ends up on the floor or in a drain finds its way back to process and must be evaporated (large cost) or sent to wastewater (even larger cost). Because of this, any unnecessary water flow that can be cut from the process is beneficial.

CHALLENGES

  • This plant faced several challenges prior to their adoption of EcoFlow valves:
  • The plant could not use mechanical seals on their pumps due to the large water demand and up-front expense of a closed recirculation system.
  • Packing was used in all pumps instead of double mechanical seals, causing leaks and constant maintenance.
  • Expensive seals were damaged every year due to accidental dry running.

HOW OUR VALVE HELPED

ThermOmegaTech® EcoFlow valves were placed on the seal water outlet of their pumps’ double mechanical seals to control the seal water temperature…

To check out the full article visit Modern Pumping Today.

Keeping Cool for the Sake of Safety

Modern Pumping Today interviewed our Vice President of Engineering, Nick Tallos, on the role thermal relief valves play in potable water systems

MPT: What applications are the ThermOmegaTech range of thermal relief valves designed for?

Nick Tallos: The primary application we found for one of our valves, which is used as a thermal relief valve, is for domestic water supply booster pumps—so we’re not talking about chemical or processing pumping with this application; the focus is on potable water for buildings. And in this application, we discovered that the pumps need to be sized for maximum demand, and they have to be run to maintain pressure throughout the building. In other words, you can’t shut it off…

MPT: How would you best describe the benefits of the ThermOmegaTech range of valves? What are your customers looking for?

Nick Tallos: We’ve had customers report that idling pumps can sometimes elevate water temperatures to what we’d consider standard for hot water taps or even scalding hot. So building managers are obviously concerned about someone in their building turning on what should be a cold water tap and unexpectedly getting hot water…

MPT: How important is customer feedback to your product offerings? What do you hear from your customers that you put into your products?

Nick Tallos: We hold customer feedback at a very high level, especially during product development. Over the years, we’ve learned that the customer wish list makes a pretty good place to start whenever we’re deciding which features should be included on a valve—whether it be pipe sizing, valve size, flow rate. There are so many applications where a self-operating valve link to temperature controls prove beneficial, even separate from pump relief, that we greatly value what our customers bring to the table…

To check out the full article visit Modern Pumping Today.

Upcoming Shows & Conventions 2018

Conventions 2018

Stop by our booth and learn how ThermOmegaTech’s innovative solutions using thermal actuator technology can protect your equipment, simplify your design, and improve your process.

Commercial Plumbing

CMPX 2018
Canadian Mechanical & Plumbing Exposition
March 21st – 23rd Toronto, Canada

ASPE  2018
Convention & Expo
September 28th – October 3rd Atlanta, GA

Railroad

ASLRRA 2018 Connections
April 7-10 Nashville, TN

Innotrans 2018
September 18th – 21st Berlin, Germany

Aerospace & Defense

Sea Air and Space
The Navy’s Leque’s Global Maritime Expositon
April 9th – 11th National Harbor, MD

Upcoming Shows & Conventions 2017

Conventions 2017

Stop by our booth and learn how ThermOmegaTech’s innovative solutions using thermal actuator technology can solve your temperature control issues.

ASLRRA 2017 Connections
April 22-26 Grapevine, TX

Valve World 2017
June 20-21 Houston, TX

RSI 2017 Railway Interchange
September 17-20 Indianapolis, IN

AeroTech Congress & Exhibition
September 26-28 Fort Worth, TX

ASPE 2017 Tech Symposium
October 19-22 Montréal, Québec

Drain-tempering Valves Limit Discharge Temperatures

From Plumbing Magazine, Hydronic Heating Systems – Drain-tempering Valves Limit Discharge Temperatures

Problem: Balboa High School, part of the public school system in San Francisco, California, needed new low-pressure steam boilers that limited maximum drain discharge temperatures.

Solution: Guttmann & Blaevoet Consulting Engineers designed the project, with Tünde Munz, P.E., LEED AP and Principal of G&B, initiating the solution. As required by code, these low-pressure boilers must have relief valves. Due to safety concerns about venting steam near where students are congregating, the designer chose to vent the relief valves into suitably sized piping, which runs to a floor drain inside the boiler room. To comply with plumbing codes limiting maximum drain discharge temperatures, the designer chose to add self-operating, thermostatic, drain-tempering valves that only inject cold water into the vent lines when the relief valves activate. These drain-tempering valves from ThermOmegaTech automatically detect when the drain temperature is above allowable levels and discharge just live casino australia enough water to temper drain flow below the allowable 140 degrees F.

Result: The drain-tempering valves require no outside power or signal, which made the installation efficient, clean, relatively simple and cost-effective.

Continue reading

Winter is Here. Protect Your Exposed Pipes

Exposed pipes can be the biggest headache for plant managers and maintenance personnel in the harsh winter months. Any sort of pump, valve, or process pipe that is exposed to harsh effects of the Winter is susceptible to freezing and bursting. As you can imagine this can create havoc in critical systems.

There are many ways to heat these pipes, but in the extreme climates, one of the most effective methods is to apply glycol tracing. Since glycol does not freeze and doesn’t require any special handling in environments that need to be explosion proof, it makes it an ideal solution.

Glycol has a very low freezing point which allows it to remain in liquid phase, even in very cold temperatures. The exceptional thermal transfer characteristics also make it the obvious choice for a cost effective heating medium.

How We Can Help.

ThermOmegaTech manufactures many valves that control the flow of, and maximize the effect of glycol through these systems. Our most popular valves for use in glycol tracing include HAT and TV/HAT.
Our valves are not reliant on electricity to operate. To regulate the flow of glycol, each of these valves contains a thermostatic element inside that modulates open or closed to maintain a constant discharge temperature. Each of them improves system efficiency by automatically varying the rate at which glycol is pumped through the system.

The Silver Bullet for Domestic Hot Water Efficiency

For years, manual balancing valves have been the industry standard in regulating the flow of recirculating domestic hot water systems. Particularly in large, populous commercial buildings, such as offices, hotels and multi-dwelling housing, maintaining perfect hot water distribution was very challenging until Pennsylvania-based manufacturer ThermOmegaTech®, Inc. launched its self-operating temperature actuated Circuit Solver thermal recirculation valve (Circuit Solver) and set a new standard.

“Even people who are very knowledgeable with years of experience in the industry are impressed with what Circuit Solver can achieve,” shares Nick Tallos, vice president of engineering for ThermOmegaTech and 40-year industry veteran himself. “They ask, ‘where was this 20 years ago,’ and call Circuit Solver a game-changing technology.

However, ThermOmegaTech is no stranger to gamechanging products. Since the company was founded by the late Fred Pirkle in 1983, it has been solving temperature control problems all over the country and the world.

“I was working with Fred before he started ThermOmegaTech,” recounts Tallos. “He was working as a sales representative for another company when he was offered a position in product development in Pennsylvania. A few years later, in the early 1980s, he decided to start his own company.

Continue reading

Domestic Hot Water: A Better Option?

By Nick Tallos

The facts are frightening – especially since the problem can be avoided.

Consider this: As many as one in 10 patients hospitalized in the U.S. contracts an infection, according to the Wall Street Journal. That means nearly 2 million patients annually are infected by bacterium or other agents.

The end result?

The cost is nearly 100,000 deaths and $6.5 billion in overall losses.
Continue reading

Domestic Hot Water: Faster, Better & Cheaper

From Green Lodging News

By Nick Tallos

“I turned on the water in the shower and waited for 10 minutes. Warm water finally started flowing, however it never lasted more than a minute and alternated mostly with cool to cold water.”

That’s the exact quote extracted from an online review of a guest who rated a hotel in Pennsylvania on Tripadvisor.com. The reviewer gave the hotel a rating of two out of a possible five. The site is full of similar comments from guests complaining about how long it took them to get hot water when they wanted to take a shower or wash their hands. Continue reading

The Importance of Showers, Eyewash Stations, and Tepid Water

From ISHN Magazine

In December 2009, a well-known manufacturing plant experienced a safety incident in which an employee was severely burned. The employee was exposed to a caustic chemical that sprayed out of a spigot and came in contact with exposed parts of his neck, hands, and arms. He was rushed to the nearest safety shower and thrust under a deluge of bone-chillingly-cold 40°F water. Due to the extremely frigid water, his body’s natural reaction was to leap out before being completely rinsed of the harmful irritant. He was then transported to the medical office where the combination of not being fully cleaned of the chemical and the length of travel time lead to worse burns than there should have been.

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z358.1-2009 is used to help plant managers and safety professionals comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations requiring employers to provide a safe workplace. This ANSI Standard establishes the universal minimum performance required for all eyewash and drench shower equipment used in plants. It states that all flushing equipment must be located in easy-to-reach areas, with the eyewash station or shower accessible within 10-seconds. This has become referred to as the 10 second rule. Additionally, eyewash stations and showers must be installed in well-lit and marked areas with a minimum flow rate of .4 GPM at 30PSI and 20 GPM at 30PSI respectively. The ANSI Standard also includes other design and operational specifications to assure that the safety showers and eyewashes are easy to use even in the case of an emergency by a victim with compromised mobility. Such features include valves that are easy to activate and will stay open once activated without having to hold a valve or handle open. OSHA regulations that apply to safety shower eyewash stations expand on the ANSI Standard requirements in certain high risk operations. For example, if open vessels containing hazardous substances are present, OSHA requires specialized safety shower and eyewash equipment to address the higher risks.